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Sam Outlaw Band
plus The Worry Dolls and Michaela Anne

Tuesday 25th July 2017

The Bullingdon, 162 Cowley Road, Oxford, OX4 1UE

Doors 7.30 pm
Tickets £15 in advance, £17 on the night
Buy tickets . . .
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Due to sound check restriction the door time indicates the earliest opportunity we can give access to the venue. Live music will start 20-30 minutes after the door open time.
Since playing for us as a duo last April at The Jericho in Oxford, Sam outlaw has won the Americana Music Association UK award for International Album Of The year, for his outstanding debut ‘Angelino’. He has now followed this up with his sophomore album ‘Tenderheart’ and will be touring the UK with a full band.

On ‘Tenderheart,’ Outlaw offers an extraordinary refinement of the artistic identity laid out on ‘Angeleno’. Sonically, the album elaborates on his “SoCal Country” sound: a sun-bleached, Baja-influenced twang that deftly points to country’s neo-traditionalists and LA’s legendary singer-songwriters. Thematically, ‘Tenderheart’ is a thesis on self-discovery and the power of love – from the cinematic mariachi-laced climax on opener “Everyone’s Looking For Home,” to the determined swagger on side-A highlight “Trouble,” to torch song showstopper “Diamond Ring” - Outlaw meditates on his own conflicted quest for peace amidst the chaos of his chosen path.

The 13-track collection of originals was recorded in the San Fernando Valley and co-produced by Outlaw alongside Martin Pradler. Outlaw enlisted many of the same musicians that made his first album, 2015’s ‘Angeleno,’ an undisputed breakthrough and one of the best-reviewed debuts of that year: harmony singer Molly Jenson, pedal steel pro Jeremy Long and guitarist Danny Garcia, along with Taylor Goldsmith (Dawes) and Bo Koster (My Morning Jacket). In addition, ‘Tenderheart’ features local mariachi group Erwin Vasquez and Mariachi Teocuitatlan.

‘Angeleno’ earned raves NPR Music, Rolling Stone Country, New Yorker, LA Times, Wall Street Journal + many more. LA weekly called him “contender to be the biggest country star L.A. has produced since Dwight Yoakam,” he landed tours with Kacey Musgraves and Yoakam, and made his TV debut on CBS Saturday Morning with a performance and interview with Anthony Mason.
Worry Dolls are a young, exciting duo born out of the joint talents of Zoe Nicol and Rosie Jones, who met in Liverpool when they were 18, both on their chosen path of becoming solo singer songwriters, and both falling under the spell of ‘O Brother, Where Art Thou?’.
Serendipity brought Zoe and Rosie together at an open mic whilst both studying music in Liverpool. Both redheads with guitars, they discovered that they had, unbeknownst to each other, been to the same hippy camps when they were young and sat around the same campfire. They also discovered that they could fight like crazy over songwriting, but regardless, they had become musical soul mates and so, after uni, they set off together making music as Worry Dolls. It was a new sound, blending the tender urgency of Zoe’s Irish-influenced voice with the fiery integrity of Rosie’s vocals and rhythmic guitar. Zoe transferred her fingerpicking skills to ukulele, followed by Earl Scruggs-style banjo, motivated by players like Emily Robison (Dixie Chicks) and Winston Marshall (Mumford & Sons).
‘Go Get Gone’ is the debut album from Worry Dolls. Recorded in Nashville and produced by Neilson Hubbard (Matthew Perryman Jones), a veteran of East Nashville’s music scene and featuring songwriting collaborations with Jeff Cohen (Teitur), Ben Glover (Gretchen Peters), Joe Doyle (Reba Mcentire) & stunning playing from Wild Ponies, Eamon McLoughlin (Ashley Monroe), Kenny Hutson (Little Big Town) & more.
Upon releasing her 2014 album, ‘Ease My Mind’ (Kingswood Records), singer-songwriter Michaela Anne garnered considerable acclaim for her introspective songwriting. The New York Times praised the “plain-spoken songs of romantic regret and small-town longing” and the Village Voice listed it among its Top 5 Country Albums of the year. Since then, however, this once-solitary diarist has transformed herself into a gregarious storyteller. Michaela Anne has discovered her inner extrovert.
‘Bright Lights and the Fame’ (Kingswood Records), recorded at Farmland Studio in Nashville, is full of sharp observations and easy wit, with several upbeat numbers tailor-made for the dance floor of the nearest honky-tonk. While there are gentler, more personal aspects to it that recall her earlier work, ‘Bright Lights and the Fame’ displays a newfound brashness, starting with the album’s cover image, in which Michaela Anne sports a bedazzled denim outfit, a vintage find that’s perfect for catching the spotlight.