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Treetop Flyers
plus support

Tuesday 13th November 2018

The Bullingdon, 162 Cowley Road, Oxford, OX4 1UE

Doors 7.30 pm
Tickets £12 in advance, £14 on the night
Buy tickets . . .
Empty Room Promotions 2018 ©
Due to sound check restriction the door time indicates the earliest opportunity we can give access to the venue. Live music will start 20-30 minutes after the door open time.
London soulful country rock outfit Treetop Flyers return with their eponymous third album, launched on 24 August via Loose. Weaving blissful 60’s tinged West Coast Americana with a British rock ’n’ roll swagger, the album oozes with soulfulness, thanks to singer Reid Morrison’s rich, warm vocals, stunning close harmonies and the atmospheric warble of a Mellotron. The sound is boosted by the addition of a new groove-based rhythm section and just the right amount of triumphant, well-judged saxophone.
 
The band was originally formed by Reid Morrison, Laurie Sherman and Sam Beer, who met whilst playing in other projects as part of the West London folk scene. They have most recently been joined by Rupert Shreeve on drums, which have added another dimension to their style and took the songs in uncharted directions that were previously out of reach. On the new record they are also joined by saxophonist Geoff Thomas Widdowson, from Loose label mates Danny and The Champions Of The World.
Treetop Flyers follows the band’s two previous critically acclaimed albums, their debut ‘The Mountain Moves’ from 2013, which was praised by The Guardian who wrote that it, “effortlessly captures the spirit of late-1960s west coast pop-rock: the Byrds and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young,” as well as Q, who wrote that they, “share with Midlake custody of a brood of Buckingham/Nicks-era Fleetwood Mac licks, likewise the Mac’s mood of unrequited yearning.” Their second album ‘Palomino’, from 2016 was praised by Uncut, who called it, “a fittingly great-sounding record, with the band magically tight and melodically assured as they play songs bathed in an evocative ’70s West Coast glow, while drawing on influences including outlaw country, soul and Nigerian psych.”

Whereas previous albums had been recorded either at their own SOUP studios in London (where Sam works) or further afield in studios in Malibu and New York, this time round they headed to The Cube in Stoke Newington. As Reid explains; “Stripping back the recording process and working within the limitations of our equipment and recording knowledge has created what we believe to be our most true to form record and has breathed new life into our music, which is one of the main reasons we have decide to simply call the album Treetop Flyers as we believe it represents a fresh start for the band.”
   
Feeling more comfortable in themselves than they have in a long time, Treetop Flyers are a band with a new lease of life and a new groove in their step. The soulful melancholy is still bubbling under the surface but this album feels altogether more triumphant, looking to the future with hope and optimism. There’s also a sense of exploration on this record, where things they had experimented with in their live show have crossed over to the tape machine, catapulting their sound to another level.