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Wild Ponies
Special guest Sam Morrow

Wednesday 23rd January 2019

Fat Lil’s, 64a Corn Street, Witney, Oxon, OX28 6BS

Doors 7.30 pm
Tickets £10 in advance, £12 on the night
Buy tickets . . .
Empty Room Promotions 2018 ©
In association with Brighthelmstone Agency
Due to sound check restriction the door time indicates the earliest opportunity we can give access to the venue. Live music will start 20-30 minutes after the door open time.
Although they're based in Nashville, Wild Ponies have always looked to Southwest Virginia —where bandmates Doug and Telisha Williams were both born and raised —for inspiration. There, in mountain towns like Galax, old-time American music continues to thrive, supported by a community of fiddlers, flat-pickers, and fans

Wild Ponies pay tribute to that powerful music and rugged landscape with 2017's ‘alax’ a stripped-back album that nods to the band's history while still pushing forward. Doug and Telisha took some of their favourite musicians from Nashville (Fats Kaplin, Will Kimbrough, Neilson Hubbard and Audrey Spillman) and met up with revered Old-Time players from Galax, Virginia (Snake Smith, Kyle Dean Smith, and Kilby Spencer). Recorded in the shed behind Doug’ old family farm in the Appalachians (steps away from the site where Doug and Telisha were married), it returns Wild Ponies to their musical and geographic roots.

Growing up, a young Doug Williams spent many an hour watching and learning as his grandfather played banjo alongside local musical legends like Snake and Kyle Dean. Although both of his grandparents have now passed away, they would surely be proud to see Doug and Telisha gathered in the shed with Snake, Kyle Dean, Kilby, and a diverse handful of the best musicians from Nashville. The result is a broad, bold approach to Appalachian music, created by a multi-cultural band whose members span several generations.
With his career-defining third record, Sam Morrow should cement his place as a member of Los Angeles' country elite. ‘Concrete and Mud’ is a confident album, rooted in Texas twang, southern stomp, and old-school funky-tonk. Recorded largely live in the studio on a vintage Neve 8068 console with producer/engineer Eric Corne at the helm, it also shines a light on Morrow's strength as a songwriter, front-man, and bandleader. At 27 years old, Morrow's found his footing as an artist and appears poised to join the ranks of West Coast heavyweights like Sam Outlaw, Jade Jackson, and Morrow's friend and label mate, Jaime Wyatt, whose vocals can be heard on three songs here.

Musically, this is Sam Morrow at his electrified, energetic peak. The sad-eyed sounds of ‘Ephemeral’ and its 2015 follow-up, ‘There Is No Map’ — both written during the early years of Morrow's sobriety — have been replaced by something more representative of Morrow's live show, in which he fronts a band of plugged-in roots-rockers. Accordingly, ‘Concrete and Mud’ doubles down on a blend of countrified funk and guitar-fuelled southern rock, shot through with train beats, Telecaster twang, bluesy slide guitar, swirling organ, with Morrow's big, booming voice front and centre. There's balance, too. For every swaggering country rocker like "Heartbreak Man" or "Good Ole Days," there's a gorgeous, emotional punch to the gut like "San Fernando Sunshine" or "The Weight of A Stone."